Event Title

Black Bricoleurs: Double-Consciousness and the (Re)Inscription of Race in the African-American Experience

Location

Weter 202

Keywords

Day of Common Learning

Description

Bricolage is French for improvisation or “do it yourself.” Keynote speaker Dr. Alondra Nelson’s discussion on root-seekers and genetic tests exposes the bricolage construction of a coherent black identity among African Americans. Since the transatlantic slave trade, African Americans have endeavored to construct a legitimatizing history and identity to justify their claims on personhood and inclusion in the social contract. This workshop is interested in black identity construction as a bricolage fashioned with whatever comes to hand or mind, as a pragmatic and eclectic approach to resolving existential, political, psychological, and spiritual issues in the black community. Dr. Hunter’s session will highlight diverse bricoleurs within the black experience and their efforts to weave biology culture, folklore, myth, religion, and historical genealogies to construct coherent black identities in their pursuit of self-dignity and human rights.

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Oct 26th, 1:00 PM

Black Bricoleurs: Double-Consciousness and the (Re)Inscription of Race in the African-American Experience

Weter 202

Bricolage is French for improvisation or “do it yourself.” Keynote speaker Dr. Alondra Nelson’s discussion on root-seekers and genetic tests exposes the bricolage construction of a coherent black identity among African Americans. Since the transatlantic slave trade, African Americans have endeavored to construct a legitimatizing history and identity to justify their claims on personhood and inclusion in the social contract. This workshop is interested in black identity construction as a bricolage fashioned with whatever comes to hand or mind, as a pragmatic and eclectic approach to resolving existential, political, psychological, and spiritual issues in the black community. Dr. Hunter’s session will highlight diverse bricoleurs within the black experience and their efforts to weave biology culture, folklore, myth, religion, and historical genealogies to construct coherent black identities in their pursuit of self-dignity and human rights.