Event Title

Facing Church Criticism as a Means of Reform

Location

McKenna 118

Keywords

Day of Common Learning

Description

This interdisciplinary panel will present students with examples of how Christian faculty engage the often justified criticisms of the Church through the lens of their respective fields. Dr. Hughes will discuss her research on British missionaries and the ways in which they refined and reformed their work in response to changing cultural, political, and economic environments. Dr. Bailey will present criticism made by literary figures like James Baldwin, Ta-Nehisi Coates, and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. Each of these authors struggles with the way the Church has historically dealt with issues surrounding race, gender and class. Rev. Dr. Katherine M. Douglass will discuss what the first steps might be in practicing such reform. Her discussion will focus on Paul's exclamation, "I die every day!" (1 Corinthians 15:31) and the theological ideas of mortification (dying) and vivification (restore to life). Together we will ponder the question, "What, in my community or personal life, must die, so that resurrection life might come?"

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Oct 18th, 1:00 PM

Facing Church Criticism as a Means of Reform

McKenna 118

This interdisciplinary panel will present students with examples of how Christian faculty engage the often justified criticisms of the Church through the lens of their respective fields. Dr. Hughes will discuss her research on British missionaries and the ways in which they refined and reformed their work in response to changing cultural, political, and economic environments. Dr. Bailey will present criticism made by literary figures like James Baldwin, Ta-Nehisi Coates, and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. Each of these authors struggles with the way the Church has historically dealt with issues surrounding race, gender and class. Rev. Dr. Katherine M. Douglass will discuss what the first steps might be in practicing such reform. Her discussion will focus on Paul's exclamation, "I die every day!" (1 Corinthians 15:31) and the theological ideas of mortification (dying) and vivification (restore to life). Together we will ponder the question, "What, in my community or personal life, must die, so that resurrection life might come?"