Event Title

The impact of race and valence on perceptions of intentionality

Faculty-Student Collaboration

1

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Brittany Christian, Ph.D.

Project Type

Research in progress

Primary Department

Psychology

Description

Nobody intends to do poorly on an exam, but might your perception of intentionality be biased by a student's race? In this 2x2 study, we examined the effects of race (African American vs. European American) and valence (positive vs. negative) on intentionality. Participants read a scenario of a student who either did well or poorly on an exam. Participants were then asked to rate their perceptions of the student's intention to achieve the resultant score. Results revealed a significant main effect of valence (positive outcome more intentional) that was qualified by a significant interaction effect suggesting that outcome valence impacted perceptions of intentionality more for African American than for European American.

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May 31st, 1:00 PM May 31st, 2:00 PM

The impact of race and valence on perceptions of intentionality

Nobody intends to do poorly on an exam, but might your perception of intentionality be biased by a student's race? In this 2x2 study, we examined the effects of race (African American vs. European American) and valence (positive vs. negative) on intentionality. Participants read a scenario of a student who either did well or poorly on an exam. Participants were then asked to rate their perceptions of the student's intention to achieve the resultant score. Results revealed a significant main effect of valence (positive outcome more intentional) that was qualified by a significant interaction effect suggesting that outcome valence impacted perceptions of intentionality more for African American than for European American.