Event Title

Exploring the relationship between parental attachment and emotional functioning during late adolescence

Faculty-Student Collaboration

1

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Jenny Vaydich, Ph.D.

Project Type

Research Proposal

Primary Department

Psychology

Description

Parental attachment is related to the development of child and adolescent emotion regulation skills. In general, research supports an association between parent-child relationships and child emotional development (e.g., Gus et al., 2015), with secure attachment being associated with more adaptive emotion regulation skills (e.g., Kerns et al., 2007). The current study sought to examine the influence of features of the parental attachment relationship on emotional functioning during late adolescence. Our findings suggest both parental communication and alienation were related to emotional reactivity; gender significantly predicted emotional reactivity and emotional suppression, which fits with previous research suggesting gender differences in emotional functioning.

Comments

This poster was also presented at Society for Research on Adolescence, Minneapolis, MN, April 2018

Copyright Status

http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/

Additional Rights Information

Copyright held by author(s).

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May 29th, 1:00 PM May 29th, 2:00 PM

Exploring the relationship between parental attachment and emotional functioning during late adolescence

Parental attachment is related to the development of child and adolescent emotion regulation skills. In general, research supports an association between parent-child relationships and child emotional development (e.g., Gus et al., 2015), with secure attachment being associated with more adaptive emotion regulation skills (e.g., Kerns et al., 2007). The current study sought to examine the influence of features of the parental attachment relationship on emotional functioning during late adolescence. Our findings suggest both parental communication and alienation were related to emotional reactivity; gender significantly predicted emotional reactivity and emotional suppression, which fits with previous research suggesting gender differences in emotional functioning.

Rights Statement

In Copyright