Document Type

Article

Publication Date

8-18-2012

Keywords

Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi, Bible Commentary

Abstract

  1. Introduction to the Twelve Prophets
  2. Historical Backdrop of the Twelve Prophets
  3. Faith and Work Before the Exile—Hosea, Amos, Obadiah, Joel, Micah
    • God Demands Change (Hosea 1:1-9, Micah 2:1-5)
    • God Makes Change Possible (Hosea 14:1-9, Amos 9:11-15, Micah 4:1-5, Obadiah 21)
    • Unjust Work (Micah 1:1-7; 3:1-2; 5:10-15)
    • Working Unjustly (Hosea 4:1-10; Joel 2:28-29)
    • Individuals’ and Communities’ Work are Interdependent (Amos 8:1-6, Micah 6:1-16)
    • Work and Worship (Micah 6:6-8; Amos 5:21-24; Hosea 4:1-10)
    • Apathy Due to Wealth (Amos 3:9-15, 6:1-7)
  4. Faith and Work During the Exile—Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah
    • God’s Punishing Hand at Work (Nahum 1:1-12; Habakkuk 3:1-19; Zephaniah 1:1-13)
    • Idolatrous Work (Habakkuk 2:1-20; Zephaniah 1:14-18)
    • Faithfulness in the Midst of Toil (Habakkuk 2:1; Zephaniah 2:1-4)
  5. Faithful Work After the Exile—Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi
    • The Need for Social Capital (Haggai 1:1-2:19)
    • Work, Worship and the Environment (Haggai 1:1-2:19; Zechariah 7:8-14)
    • Both Sin and Hope Remain Present in Work (Malachi 1:1-4:6)
  6. Jonah and God's Blessing for All Nations
    • Jonah’s Call and Response (Jonah 1:1-17)
    • God’s Blessing for All Nations (Jonah 1:16, 3:1-4:2)
    • God’s Care for Those Who Respond to His Call (Jonah 1:3,12-14, 17; 2:10; 4:3-8)
  7. Conclusions to the Twelve Prophets
  8. Key Verses and Themes Cross Reference in the Twelve Prophets

Comments

Contributed to Digital Commons @ SPU with permission from the Theology of Work Project.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

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