Event Title

Building Community Archives: Vietnamese Portland

Presentation Types

Presentation

Start Date

27-10-2020 10:30 AM

End Date

27-10-2020 11:00 AM

Keywords

Service-Learning, Community-Based Learning

Description

Portland is a city of immigrants. From nineteenth century settlers who colonized the Willamette Valley, to waves of migration from the Former Soviet Union in the 1990s, our city is built on the struggle for belonging. Watzek Library’s Special Collections Department at Lewis & Clark College is creating a collection that documents the experiences of the Vietnamese-American population of Portland. Our goals for this collection are two-fold: We want all researchers in the Portland community to have the opportunity to work with resources that scrupulously document the history of the city in which they live, and we want readers from a range of backgrounds to see their stories reflected in our collection. We are accomplishing this by collecting oral histories and historical artifacts from members of the community and making them accessible digitally and in the reading rooms of Watzek Library. Alongside this, we disseminate information about this LSTA funded project, and spurring curiosity in our community about the stories that we are now able to share.

In this session, participants will explore the challenges to building a community archive, especially from an academic perspective. Focusing on service and community-based learning, we will consider how to create opportunities, both for student-led research and for the larger city to participate in the university.

Dr. Hannah Leah Crummé is Head of Special Collections and Archives at Lewis & Clark College in Portland, Oregon. She completed her doctoral research at King’s College, London. While much of her research focuses on the impact of the Spanish language on the development of poetic and political ideas of the Renaissance, she is also the lead researcher on the LSTA and CIC funded project "Vietnamese Portland: Memory, History, Community". This seven year project, undertaken in 2017, is designed to increase the diversity of Lewis & Clark's archive and create more inclusive documentation of the city of Portland. She has recently edited several collections, including Re-examining the Literary Coterie, 1580-1780 (Palgrave-Macmillan, 2016) and Shakespeare on Record: Researching an Early Modern Life (Arden, 2019, for which she was awarded the British Record Association Janette Harley Prize). Her work has appeared in Notes and Queries (2009), the Journal for the Spanish and Portuguese Society for English Renaissance Studies (2011), The Politics of Female Households: Ladies-in-Waiting across Europe (Brill, 2013), and Studies in Philology (2017). Hannah’s reviews appear regularly in the Times Literary Supplement. Her edition of The Life and Papers of Jane Dormer, Duchess of Feria (1538-1612) is under advanced contract with the University of Toronto Press. She sits on the Board of Directors of the Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Studies. At Lewis & Clark she is an enthusiastic instructor, eager to grow the college's collections, and excited to process the never-ending archive.

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Oct 27th, 10:30 AM Oct 27th, 11:00 AM

Building Community Archives: Vietnamese Portland

Portland is a city of immigrants. From nineteenth century settlers who colonized the Willamette Valley, to waves of migration from the Former Soviet Union in the 1990s, our city is built on the struggle for belonging. Watzek Library’s Special Collections Department at Lewis & Clark College is creating a collection that documents the experiences of the Vietnamese-American population of Portland. Our goals for this collection are two-fold: We want all researchers in the Portland community to have the opportunity to work with resources that scrupulously document the history of the city in which they live, and we want readers from a range of backgrounds to see their stories reflected in our collection. We are accomplishing this by collecting oral histories and historical artifacts from members of the community and making them accessible digitally and in the reading rooms of Watzek Library. Alongside this, we disseminate information about this LSTA funded project, and spurring curiosity in our community about the stories that we are now able to share.

In this session, participants will explore the challenges to building a community archive, especially from an academic perspective. Focusing on service and community-based learning, we will consider how to create opportunities, both for student-led research and for the larger city to participate in the university.

Dr. Hannah Leah Crummé is Head of Special Collections and Archives at Lewis & Clark College in Portland, Oregon. She completed her doctoral research at King’s College, London. While much of her research focuses on the impact of the Spanish language on the development of poetic and political ideas of the Renaissance, she is also the lead researcher on the LSTA and CIC funded project "Vietnamese Portland: Memory, History, Community". This seven year project, undertaken in 2017, is designed to increase the diversity of Lewis & Clark's archive and create more inclusive documentation of the city of Portland. She has recently edited several collections, including Re-examining the Literary Coterie, 1580-1780 (Palgrave-Macmillan, 2016) and Shakespeare on Record: Researching an Early Modern Life (Arden, 2019, for which she was awarded the British Record Association Janette Harley Prize). Her work has appeared in Notes and Queries (2009), the Journal for the Spanish and Portuguese Society for English Renaissance Studies (2011), The Politics of Female Households: Ladies-in-Waiting across Europe (Brill, 2013), and Studies in Philology (2017). Hannah’s reviews appear regularly in the Times Literary Supplement. Her edition of The Life and Papers of Jane Dormer, Duchess of Feria (1538-1612) is under advanced contract with the University of Toronto Press. She sits on the Board of Directors of the Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Studies. At Lewis & Clark she is an enthusiastic instructor, eager to grow the college's collections, and excited to process the never-ending archive.