Event Title

Self-regulation strategies during a delay of gratification task: Group differences in children with ASD and typical development.

Faculty-Student Collaboration

1

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Beverly J. Wilson, Ph.D.

Project Type

Completed quantitative research study

Primary Department

Clinical Psychology

Description

Significant research utilizing young children with typical development (TD) indicates the ability to delay gratification predicts numerous positive outcomes (Feldman & Klein, 2003). Few studies have investigated this relation in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The current study investigated differences between young children with ASD and their TD peers on a Delay of Gratification task (DoG; Cournoyer & Trudel, 1991; Mischel et al., 1988). We also investigate group differences in self-regulatory strategies and temptation behaviors during this task. Findings indicated that children with ASD were more likely than children with TD to engage in temptation behaviors.

Comments

This poster was also displayed at the International Meeting for Autism Research, San Francisco, CA, May 2017

Additional Rights Information

Copyright held by author(s).

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 31st, 1:00 PM May 31st, 2:00 PM

Self-regulation strategies during a delay of gratification task: Group differences in children with ASD and typical development.

Significant research utilizing young children with typical development (TD) indicates the ability to delay gratification predicts numerous positive outcomes (Feldman & Klein, 2003). Few studies have investigated this relation in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The current study investigated differences between young children with ASD and their TD peers on a Delay of Gratification task (DoG; Cournoyer & Trudel, 1991; Mischel et al., 1988). We also investigate group differences in self-regulatory strategies and temptation behaviors during this task. Findings indicated that children with ASD were more likely than children with TD to engage in temptation behaviors.